Sprinter Camper Conversion: Things I Learned

We chose a 2015 Sprinter 144 for our family of 4 camper van. It is our third camping van and our second camping conversion. We chose it because we drive more than we camp.

I am not much of a camper. In fact, I am really only starting to learn to camp and this can be painfully obvious for my husband at times. It was recently that I realized it would be best if I tried to learn to camp.

I am really a cottage girl. I grew up with a cottage and that is where my skillsets lie. It could be argued that few are more skilled at the art of cottaging. I can arrive at the cottage any time day or night and have everything I need. My biggest concern may be getting the cold food and drinks in the fridge and my chair positioned correctly on the deck.

So, here I am, the proud owner of a Sprinter 144 DIY camper conversion. There are dozens of great things about this van! CD gets all of the credit for the modifications. They are amazing and have helped to ease me into van life. New cabinets, fishing rod holders, and LED lights are our latest upgrades.

Even with these latest upgrades, 2020 has been an eye opening year. Here are a few things I have learned so far.

1. A Van Chosen For Driving May Not Be Ideal For Camping

It may seem like I am stating the obvious but this one took me a bit to wrap my head around. Last summer’s trip racked up 8528 miles and 190 hours and 55 minutes of total trip time. Our average mileage was 23.4 miles per gallon.

Our van is easy to drive in nearly all conditions. It is fast, comfortable, gets decent mileage, can park in any parking spot, and makes a U turn like nobody’s business. We may drive a couple of hundred miles during a day in the Rockies but nearly 1000 miles once we hit the plains. No matter how many miles we put on in a day, we rarely spend more than an afternoon at a campground. Our Sprinter has rolled into some of our country’s most beautiful campgrounds at dinner and left the next day. We have slept at a gas station in South Dakota, a rest stop in southern Michigan, friends driveways all over the US and Canada, and plenty of Walmarts.

Yet, our van is a Sprinter 144 DIY camping conversion. So what happens when we camp?

Sprinter camper conversion

2. Camping In Our Sprinter Is More Like Car Camping Than Van Living.

It turns out that I don’t really know how to camp. Even the best camping conversion may be hard for me to navigate.

My cooler is always a mess. I spill things and burn dinner regularly. I am constantly rearranging everything. At the campground, I take things out of the van and put them back in the van. CD recently pointed out that even people with RVs tend to arrange thier campsite by using outside space. I have since noticed water coolers on tables, dish washing stations on benches, accesory tables full of who knows what, chairs all over the place, laterns, and so many things that I can’t even remember.

So, is the idea to set up and tear down your own mini cottage at each campsite? If so, I think I can work towards that, although I am not sure I fully understand it yet.

Are these the things that I use to build my mini-cottage each week? Sprinter camper conversion

3. Camping In Our Sprinter Is More Like Car Camping Than Thru-Hiking

Okay, this one is really for CD. He has hiking tons of long trails, including thru hiking the PCT in 2004. Some of the skills that he learned on the PCT are not fully transferrable to our Sprinter. He does not need to drink the cooking water, save his one spork for every meal, eat two breakfasts, or check his pack weight for our day hike. Even though he doesn’t need to, he does all of this anyway. I guess that if I need to set up a mini cottage each week, he can act as if he is on a thru-hike! I am just glad that he hasn’t gone back to eating pop tarts in order to up his calories!

CD’s tent on the PCT

4. Putting Up A Tent Does Not Mean We Failed Our Sprinter Camper Conversion

The kids love tents. If we were staying at a campground for a few days and put a tent up near our Sprinter, it would not mean that we failed. It may mean that CD can sleep alone outside or the kids can play in the shade during the hottest part of the day.

The only time we put up a tent next to this Sprinter was last summer when we took our annual camping trip with my nephew. CD slept in my twenty year old tent. The rain seeped up from below and he soon realized that it is no longer water proof! The kids and I laughed about it while watching the storm from inside the van.

This was our first Sprinter and this actually did mean we failed. The low roof Sprinter did not work for us and we often used a tent to escape it! Waterton National Park

5. Camping, Either By Van Or Not, Requires Skill and Practice

It takes time to put up the table, organize the dishwashing station, unpack the kayaks, look for a fishing hole, or find a place to launch a boat. This all takes time away from my personal rest and relaxation. How much does that matter? Not much, I guess. My time is currently well spent organizing campsites and exploring unchartered rivers. Do I wish I was sitting on a deck or in a super fancy Sprinter drinking coffee and waiting for the best time to go fishing? Well, maybe – but now that I know that the van is just one part of the campsite, everything is looking up!

Schwarz camp

Would I change anything about our Sprinter camper conversion?

Not really. Well, maybe. Given endless time and a bottomless wallet, I would get a custom built Sprinter 170 for driving and camping. CD could spend his time doing minor modifications to the exsisting camping conversion, rather than being in charge of every detail starting with camping conversion design all the way through finish carpentry.

Wood paneling around rear AC. Part of our recent upgrades!

Would I recommend a Sprinter 144 camper conversion for a family?

Sure. Please make peace with its limitations in space and love its efficiency! I do!

Please like and follow our blog.

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Pictured Rocks National Lake Shore: In An Afternoon

Do you have 1 day to spend at Pictured Rocks but are unsure of how to spend the time? If so, here is our recommendation!

We drove west from Munising, swam in Lake Superior, waded in streams, and hiked to the Au Sable Light Station.

Here are a few things to know about going to the light station.

1. The last 1.5 miles to the Au Sable Light Station is on foot.

You can either walk the trail or walk the beach. We walked the trail there, had a picnic there, and walked the beach back!

2. You can see Lake Superior both from the top of the light house and from the beach. It is amazing either way!

3. There is a ship wreck on the beach between the light house and the trail head.

The shipwreck is different than most I have seen. It is just a skeleton of a boat and is fully accessible from the beach. You may be aware that lake levels change over time. This picture was 2019 so the water was relatively high compared with past years but a bit lower than 2020.

4. Remember to bring your National Park Passport and Junior Ranger books.

We carried drinks, sandwiches, snacks, sunscreen, hats, and plenty of other things. We didn’t bring our passport books and had to settle for a stamp on a blank piece of paper. Its not the same!

5. You may end up swimming in Lake Superior.

It may sound cold and daunting but, on a hot day, it is clean, clear, and refreshing! It was unbelievable hot the day we were there. I wasn’t prepared to swim in the lake and ended up taking a nice long swim in my tee shirt and skirt. It wasn’t my proudest moment but I was perfectly content, comfortably cool, and it was worth it! Next time I will be better prepared!

6.Wear water shoes and carry bug repellent.

The beach is rocky in places and all of the tales that you may have heard about biting flies in the U.P. of Michigan are true!

7. Consider stopping once or twice on your drive to the trail head.

You may want to plan enough time to go wading in a stream.

8. The ranger talk at the light station offers a quick glimpse of the history.

Learn about the Au Sable light station, Lake Superior, and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. The tours are thirty minutes long and require a $3 donation per person.

Follow our blog for more adventures!

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Traveling During A Pandemic: 8 Things to Consider.

We drive from Oregon to Ontario and back each summer. Typically, we spent several weeks on the road and explore everywhere from British Columbia to Colorado. This year is different. We are in Colorado, halfway to Michigan. Here are some reflections from the first half of our trip: 8 things to consider when traveling during a pandemic.

1. Camping is more complicated than usual when traveling during a pandemic.

The first night on the road: Campground #1 was closed. The local Walmart did not allow overnight parking. Campground #2 was full but we drove in anyway and the camp host pointed us towards a spot that was open due to a cancellation. We felt so lucky! In the morning was drove to the day use area and it was pretty much full. We were able to snag a spot to the side and hike in an area away from the river.

Tumalo State Park, Bend, Oregon

The second night we were in Utah. I cannot speak to the situation at Utah State Parks because we arrived in Ogden around 10:30 and Utah State Park campgrounds close and lock gates at 10 pm.

We broke one of our own unwritten rules and ended up at a KOA. Again, we were lucky! It was barely occupied, clean, spacious, and had affordable tent sites for our van. It was pouring rain and we were lucky to be self sufficient.

The third night we opted to stop driving at around dinner time. We were at Dinosaur National Monument and stayed at the campground. It was easy and great. The hosts came over to welcome us, which would have been great if they had been wearing masks. Overall, it was still a hit!

Dinosaur National Monument

2. Be prepared to be amazed and scared.

We left a highly mask and social distancing compliant town in Oregon in order to travel and see our families. It turns out that the rest of the world is going on with their lives and not necessarily very compliant.

I was almost immediately shocked by the lack of masks compliance. We haven’t been in any stores or even gas stations but I have been watching people go in and out of places as we drive through. We spotted 1 mask the entire time we were in Utah. Eastern Oregon was the same. Steamboat Springs and Summit County Colorado were a bit better but, overall, I was horrified and a bit scared.

3. Bring more food and drinks than usual.

I packed food and drinks for weeks. This includes snack size bags of chips, M & Ms, Diet Coke, Gatorade, and all the provisions that you would usually run into a gas station to pick up. We have not been in a gas station or store and do not intend to change that.

4. Consider a camping conversion that includes a toilet.

Again, we have not been into gas stations, campground bathrooms, stores or restaurants. This is probably self explanatory.

5. You may feel guilty at times.

I find myself feeling like I need to justify why we are traveling.

During a remote work meeting while on the road, I felt the need to explain why we chose to travel and every precaution we are taking. I did not do that but I still want to call the people in that meeting and tell them all about it.

It is easy to find myself reviewing these points in my own mind in order to justify this trip.

6. You may find yourself judging others while traveling during a pandemic.

I find myself judging other people behaviors which is kind of funny because they could be judging me as I drive by with my out of state plates.

A playground full of mask-less adults and kids without social distancing while driving through Salt Lake City had me judging them for sure. I am aware that this is neither appropriate nor helpful.

7. Empty parking lots are more appealing than ever before.

CD and the kids spent two hours in a National Forest Service Parking lot in Utah. I was on a phone call and they set up hammocks and cooked lunch. They were happy.

Traveling during a pandemic

I cooked lunch on a our camping table in the parking lot of an abandoned department store in Idaho. We ran laps to the lamp post and back. It wasn’t our usual picturesque lunch at a park or splash pad but it was okay.

8. You will wonder if traveling during a pandemic was the right choice.

This is impossible to know. We will just do our best to keep clear minds and hearts.

Please like and follow our blog!

Dinosaur National Monument: 5 Things to Know
Packing for a Pandemic Road Trip.
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Grant Kohrs Ranch: Don’t Miss This Stop!

It can be hard to find quick and fun places to stop when traveling on an interstate. One day when the kids were restless, hungry, and road-weary, we happened to find Grant Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site. It was the best part of our day and a great memory from our trip.

Here are some reasons to stop at Grant-Kohrs Ranch.

1. It is close to I-90.

The ranch is easily accessible from the interstate and is 3.5 hours from Glacier National Park to the west and Yellowstone National Park to the east.

There is a large parking lot, restrooms, and water. We enjoyed a picnic lunch next to our van after our ranch tour. We felt rested and ready to hit the road again by the time we were done. It was great!

2. The kids can try using a lasso while the parents try cowboy coffee.

Wood crates, designed for lasso practice, are spread out in an open space between barns.

A cowboy makes coffee at a chuck wagon. Sip your drink while hearing stories of real life on the trail! Check out the chuck wagon to find out what people were eating and drinking. Imagine cooking with the tools they had and eating out on the prairie.

3. Get your National Park stamps and Junior Ranger badges at Grant Kohrs Ranch.

4. Take a self-guided tour of historic buildings.

Tour a barn that has been in use since 1870 and a stable that was built in 1883. Grant Kohl’s is a working ranch so you never know what you will see!

Signs offer info about each item on the ranch. Tools, old wagons, horse shoes, saws, clothes, chairs, beds.

5. Take a guided tour of the ranch house.

Check out the Ranger tours to get a more in depth look inside some of the historic houses.

6. See a blacksmith at work.

Watch a blacksmith using old style techniques. We spent most of our time here and it was fun to watch real hooks and tools being made.

See real tools being made over a coal fire! It was tons of fun and we learned a lot!

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Glacier National Park: An Afternoon At Two Medicine

Packing for a Pandemic Road Trip.

I never expected to be writing about packing for a pandemic road trip. I consider packing to be a highly subjective and personal topic. Everyone has different preferences and techniques for packing based on their needs.

So, here I am, mid pandemic, packing for our annual cross country road trip.

Below are 5 ways that Covid 19 is changing our trip.

1. Food. Much More Food.

We cook nearly all of our meals at the van and have been surprised how many beautiful and out of the way spots we have found only because we wanted to cook lunch.

With that being said, we also love fresh fruits, local food, and finding reasons to get out of the van mid-road trip. Over the years, I have learned to pack less food and stop more often. We enjoy checking out fruit stands and local grocery stores. We stretch our legs, soak up the culture, and buy food often during our trips.

This time, however, I have been stock piling food. Costco, Safeway, and homemade cookie baking have supplied enough food to live in our van for weeks. To CD’s dismay, I have even resorted to 54 single serving bags of chips, granola bars, drink boxes, and even a few bottles of water. I basically made my own convenience store in the back of our Sprinter. We will see how far it gets us!

2. Clorox Wipes and Hand Sanitizer.

While I like to keep things clean, I am not prone to wiping things down all day long. We use water with a spigot and a bar of soap to wash our hands before we eat. I typically carry one tiny bottle of hand sanitizer for emergencies. This time I packed two containers of Clorox wipes, two large bottles and three small bottles of hand sanitizer. I still have the bar of soap but that just didn’t seem like it would cut it. We will see.

3. Masks.

I didn’t see this one coming. I have two adult makes with ties, two adult masks with elastic, two kids masks with ties, two adult N95s, two kids N95s, and a bit of anxiety. As a health care provider, I hope that we don’t get into a situation that seems like it requires a N95. Wish us luck.

4. Luggable Loo And Extra Accessories.

The Luggable Loo is our potty of choice. I use biodegradable bags and poo powder. I have not typically bought extras. This time I did.

5. Guitar.

Okay, this isn’t new but it seems like a good idea when faced with a socially distant pandemic road trip. I can already hear the music.

Please follow our blog to hear about our trip!

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Sprinter Van Shopping List For The Minimalist
Storage In Our Sprinter: A simple solution
Fresh food. This time it may look more like empty chip bags and mac and cheese but we shouldn’t be hungry.

Sprinter Camper Conversion: Amenities

Our first Sprinter camper conversion was a 2012 low roof passenger van with limited amenities. It didn’t work out.

We are a family of four and stand by our decision to camp and travel in a passenger van but our decision to start with a low roof van was ill informed and flawed.

5 reasons why we chose a low roof Sprinter:

  1. It would be a more practical daily driver.
  2. We could drive under bridges, park in parking garages, or go through a drive thru.
  3. Additional vertical space wouldn’t offer additional benefits.
  4. The kids can stand up and I can nearly stand up.
  5. It cost less.

5 reasons why this reasoning was flawed:

  1. A low roof and a high roof are essentially the same when using as a daily driver.
  2. Parking in a parking garage, going through a drive thru, or driving under some bridges may not be possible in either Sprinter.
  3. Vertical space adds many more storage options!
  4. I really want to stand up. Oh, my aching back!
  5. The low roof initially cost less but we lost any initial savings when we sold it four months later.

All about us.

  • We are a family of four, including two kids under 10.
  • More days are spent driving than camping.
  • We love windows!
  • CD is 6′ tall and I am 5’8″. We are both over 40 and maybe not as flexible as we once were.
  • Sometimes we stop along the road just to hang out in the van.
  • Money is a consideration but we would rather spend a bit more to have a van that suits us than have an aching back and a cluttered van.
Our high roof Sprinter with some fun amenities.
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Passenger Van: Pros and Cons

Pros:

Windows!

  • The kids can see.
  • Improved visual field when driving.
  • We can see if the kids are in the van from outside.
  • Sunsets!

Cons:

Windows.

  • People can see in from outside. It doesn’t bother me really but it is worth being aware.
  • We spent a few hours and a little money making curtains. Each day we spend a little time putting up and taking down curtains.

Seats

  • Safe seats for the kids.
  • Seats for family members and friends.

Seats

  • Spare seats take up garage space.
  • The spare seats are not easily removed and re-installed.
Sprinter amenities. Seats anyone?

Other Sprinter Amenities: Blind Spot Monitor, Electric Running Board, and Cross Wind Assist

These are things that our first van did not have. Do we enjoy these features?

Yes!

Blind spot monitor: changes my experience every day!

Electric running board: a bench, a welcome mat, a table, and a reminder to close the door fully.

Cross wind assist: We think it actually helps.

Thoughts on rear AC.

Rear AC: It cools the van to arctic temperatures, even on the hottest days. Luckily, it cools all the way to the front as the main AC isn’t very effective. I sometimes walk to the back and realize that the kids need blankets while I am just right. We debate its importance each time we look at solar panels for our roof but then re-affirm our need for it each summer. Our solar panels will work around it and our Maxxair fan fit just fine.

Please follow our blog and our Sprinter adventures!

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For other insight on choosing a van, check out this article!

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Oregon’s Coast, Manzanita: A Hidden Gem.

It is well known that the Oregon coast if full of breathtaking scenery and widespread ocean access. Hidden among the 362 miles of Oregon’s coastline is the town of Manzanita.

Manzanita is in Tillamook county, north of Lincoln City and south of Astoria. It is home to seven miles of coastline and beaches. With a population only in the triple digits, the effects of tourism are obvious. The benefits to those that vacation there are great.

The Main Street

Lenada Avenue is the heart of downtown. Restaurants, coffee houses, and shops have names like Left Coast Siesta, Neahkanie Bistro, Bread and Ocean Bakery, and MacGregor’s: A Whiskey Bar.

The Beach, Oregon’s Coast

From town, the beach is steps away. Our Meredith Lodging rental house was across from Hallensted Park, 6 blocks from the main street and two blocks from the beach.

This sign says it all!
Great beaches!
The main road from town ends where the other people are standing. Oregon’s Coast.

NeahKahnie Mountain

Don’t miss this hike! Oswald State Park offers a 8 mile long mountain loop trail or a 2.8 mile shorter version. The trail is well taken care of and inviting.

The trees are welcoming also

It is a steady but not impossible climb with plenty of chances to slow down and explore. We used our favorite kids carrier a few times, more so for fun than out of necessity.

If you haven’t already, check out the Piggyback Rider Standing Kids Carrier.

Walking is good but a standing child carrier is great

For our hike, we opted for the shorter version. Once at the summit, we agreed that the effort to reward ratio of this hike was great! A short scramble at the top leads to some of my best views of Oregon’s coast.

Oregon Coast, looking south and beyond that as well.

Please follow our blog for more good times!

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Leavenworth Washington In An Afternoon
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Leavenworth Washington In An Afternoon

We took a side trip to Leavenworth from our road trip northbound on Washington 97.

Was it worth it? Absolutely!

4 Things To Know For Your First Time In Leavenworth Washington

  1. The town center is basically a Bavarian Village.
  2. Every season is tourist season in Leavenworth. Parking may be an issue and it helps to be patient your first time visiting.
  3. It is on the edge of the North Cascades and the scenery is straight out of a magazine.
  4. While it is great to spend an afternoon there, a week would be even better!

3 Things To Do On A Summer Afternoon in Leavenworth Washington

  1. Eat. Even if you aren’t hungry, this town calls you to eat and drink. Food is everywhere, including brats, beer, and everything German.

2. Walk downtown. Window shop and soak in the culture.

We walked on our own but saw several groups of guided walking tours. It sounds like Leavenworth may have some interesting history to share.

View to the West. Leavenworth, Washington.

3. Spend some time at Waterfronk Park.

Walk a few blocks downhill from town and you will arrive at Waterfront Park. The Wenatchee river’s inviting swimming holes and beautiful scenery are made even more fun by a festive parade of tubes and kayaks.

Bring a snack and you could stay all day!

Waterfront Park, Leavenworth, Washington

2 Circumstances That Lead To Staying At Wenatchee Confluence State Park

  1. Leavenworth is at capacity and you don’t have a reservation.
  2. You are headed northbound on 97 and just passing through.

7 Reasons To Love Staying at Wenatchee Confluence State Park

  1. It is approximately 30 minutes from Leavenworth.
  2. You may get lucky and get a deal! We arrived around dinner time. The park was full but they sometimes allow “overflow” parking for a fraction of the price! We scored a lake side spot with flush toilets, hot showers, bike path access, a beach, and a playground!

3. Flush toilets and hot showers.

4. A playground and picnic tables.

5. Open green space.

6. A beach.

7. Apple Capital Loop Trail.

We rode our bikes on miles and miles of this trail. It circles the Columbia River with 22 miles of paved trail. The trail can be used to connect Wenatchee Confluence State Park with Horan Nature Area, Walla Walla Point Park, and Wenatchee Riverfront Park.

We spend most of a day that was intended for driving, riding this trail and I would do it again.

Please like and follow our blog for more adventures!

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Cranbrook BC: Stop and Enjoy. 5 Things to Love.

Cranbrook, BC is sometimes on route between Oregon and Ontario, or more specifically between Creston and Waterton Lakes National Park.

Disclosure: Please note that this post contains affiliate links. This means that we may get a small commission if you click a link and purchase something that we recommend. Clicking these links will not cost you extra money but will help us grow our website. Thank you for your support!

How did we first discover Cranbrook, BC?

Notice the bugs on our windshield!

Our journey to loving Cranbrook started at Moyie Lake Provincial Park, late one afternoon.

We stopped to stretch our legs and look for a place to sleep for the night. Moyie Lake Provincial Park is easy to access from Highway 3/95, and offers exclusive public access to the lake, tons of green grass, sandy beaches, flush toilets, picnic tables, a playground, and beautiful views.

Moyie Lake Provincial Park

Day use parking at the beach is easy to find. I grabbed a picnic table for dinner and the kids hit the beach.

Things started to go bad pretty quickly, however, when I swatted one fly while getting the cooler and a second fly while getting the stove.

By the time I was set up to cook there were more flies than I have ever seen in one place and I am from Michigan so I have seen a few black flies. This, however, were the black fly scary stories that people tell around campfires during full moons.

I rushed dinner, ran everything back to the van, and by some stroke of luck, the van was nearly fly-free. The van was a mess, I was frazzled, and desperate to get back on the road again!

Anytime, other than this day in mid-June, I would gladly endorse staying at Moyie Lake but we certainly were not staying that day.

If you decide to stay there in June, here are a few items that I may consider packing.

Fly strips – yes, these still make these and you can hang them in your van!

Mosquito head netting may seem like overkill but I would have paid good money for a head net!

Where did we stay?

We rolled into Cranbrook just before dark and, for lack of a better plan, followed the little signs with the blue camping symbol. We didn’t have much confidence in this plan as the signs led us right into town and to the front desk of Mount Baker RV Park.

If you are anything like me, you may want to stop reading as soon as you see the words “RV Park” but please continue reading! Mount Baker RV Park was like a little bit of paradise. In that moment, it was everything we needed and then some!

One side of the park are RV hookups and the other side leads over bridge crossing a stream to a open green space that is intended mostly for tents. There were not any tents in that space and we didn’t need hook-ups, so we paid the nominal fee and slept in a field of freshly cut grass, next to a river, with flush toilets, hot showers, and laundry facilities.

I didn’t really even need to do laundry but I did anyways. The kids threw sticks in the river, kicked soccer balls, and did somersaults. Things couldn’t get any better!

We woke up the next day and realized that we really were in the town of Cranbrook. From Mount Baker RV Park, we walked to town and loved what we saw.

Cranbrook BC: 5 Things To Love

1. The Historic Downtown

A few blocks from our campground we found the historic downtown full of local shops and restaurants.

2. The people

Locals on the street and in shops smiled and stopped to chat. People in cars smiled and waved “hello” as we crossed streets or parking lots.

3. The restaurants

Historic downtown offered tons of food options. We weren’t even looking for a restaurant but we couldn’t resist!

Soul Food is a local farm to table cafe and restaurant. We sat at a table outside, had drinks and two rounds of food!

Soulfood. Cranbrook BC

4. Diverse downtown shopping

Just as we weren’t really looking for a restaurant and we didn’t really need to do laundry, we weren’t really looking for a large grocery store but there we were. Historic downtown Cranbrook, a stone’s throw from our campground, also happened to have a large chain grocery store so we picked up some odds and ends!

5. Cycling routes, side walks, and parks

Cranbrook has it all. There are bike lanes, cycling routes, cross walks, and parks all over downtown. Check it out! You won’t be disappointed!

Please follow our blog for more adventures!

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6 Great Surprises along the Trans-Canada Highway.

My husband, myself, our 5 year old son, and 3 year old daughter traveled from Oregon to Ontario via British Columbia and Alberta. I had wanted to drive the Trans-Canada Highway for at least the ten years prior. It was everything that I hoped for and more!

We looked out the window and stopped when whenever we wanted.

Here are 5 unexpected things that we loved while traveling from Salmon Arm to Banff.

1. Revelstoke.

Are you kidding? Revelstoke is amazing!

It is like a mountain oasis on the banks of the Columbia River.

In 2016, when we were there, Revelstoke apparently had a population of just over 6,700 and by 2019 that increased to over 14,000. As far as I can tell, that is for good reason.

The town is full of local cafes and shops. Food options are endless. Whether you are looking for organic, homemade, local, vegan, vegetarian, grass fed, or just delicious, you will find what it! People are friendly and kind.

The mountain resort is modern and has views for miles. The mountainside lodging in June was too much of a deal to pass up. We signed on for a slope side 2 bedroom with a kitchen and patio. I recommend bringing food and drinks from town if you are staying more than a night but the room will not disappoint!

You will see bears if you are lucky. The mountain coaster is super fun. The views are remarkable.

2. Spiral Tunnels along the Trans-Canada Highway.

I had never even heard of a spiral tunnel. When we saw our first one we were amazed. Then we wanted to learn more!

There are two view points. One along the Trans-Canada Highway just over 7 kilometers east of Field.

Basically, an train leaves Field going eastbound and goes through two tunnels, under the highway, across the river and into the Lower Spiral Tunnel. The train spirals up and exits the tunnel higher than where it started. It crosses the river again, goes under the highway, and into a second tunnel. It exits that tunnel higher yet.

You have the opportunity to see each end of the train at different altitudes at the same time. Does that make sense? It does when you see it!

3. Yamnuska Wolfdog Santuary

The kids were ready to stretch theirs legs. This was near the highway and so popped in.
The staff are kind and obviously care for the animals. The kids like it and I continue to find wolves kind of creepy.

It’s a nice stop and welcome rest break on the way east bound to Banff.

4. National Parks along the Tran-Canada Highway.

Mt. Revelstoke, Glacier, and Yoho are all packed into a short piece of the Trans-Canada Highway. I will let these parks speak for themselves. Stop at each one, especially Yoho. You won’t be disappointed.

5. Via Feratta,Banff.

Via Feratta is Italian for “iron way”. It is a climbing route with cables, ladders, and fixed anchors.

This is the view of Banff from the Via Feratta.

6. Banff: The Less Crowded Side.

Here is a picture of an afternoon away from main street, tour groups, and hotels parking garages. This side of Banff isn’t hard to find.